Social Studies

SOCIAL STUDIES
ICA requirement: 30 credits   UC/CSU requirement: 30 credits

Ancient World History 
Two Semesters  UC/CSU  
Ancient History is a yearlong course that examines the basic building blocks of selected ancient civilizations from Asia, the Middle East, Mesoamerica, Europe and Africa. It explores how representative civilizations organized their societies, earned and distributed their wealth, developed their belief systems, and contributed unique discoveries in the arts and sciences. While focusing on what made each of these civilizations unique, this course also recognizes the common threads that weave all of humanity together. Additionally, this course examines how the ideas of the past are still influencing the world of today. Students will also master the fundamentals of political and physical geography.

Modern World History 
Two Semesters  UC/CSU  
Modern World History explores the dynamic history of the modern world from the Enlightenment thinkers through current global issues, 18th century to the present. There are two overarching questions that guide our course, they include: one, how has the world come to look the way that it does, and two, how can we create change in an ever-changing world.

Modern World History Honors 
Two Semesters  UC/CSU 
Prerequisite: Recommendation of Ancient World History teacher
Modern World History explores the dynamic history of the modern world from the Enlightenment thinkers through current global issues, 18th century to the present. There are two overarching questions that guide our course, they include: one, how has the world come to look the way that it does, and two, how can we create change in an ever-changing world. This course covers in greater depth material surveyed in the Modern World History course. Supplementary study of relevant literature, music, art and other primary and secondary sources augments student understanding of various civilizations studied. Particular emphasis is placed on developing students’ critical thinking, discussion and writing skills.

United States History 
Two Semesters  UC/CSU  
Prerequisite: Credit in Modern World History or Modern World History Honors 
The United States History course presents various themes, concepts and perspectives that run throughout the country's history with particular emphasis on social justice and civic responsibility. Students will not only learn about the history of America through a variety of teaching strategies and practices but also come to appreciate how they can become productive, informed citizens of the United States.

United States History Honors 
Two Semesters  UC/CSU  
Prerequisite: Recommendation of Modern World History or Honors Modern World History teacher
Designed as an equivalent to a college-level survey course, the AP/Honors United States History curriculum challenges students not only to investigate critically and comprehensively the major developments in American history but also to develop the analytical skills necessary to deal with those developments authoritatively. Students will learn to assess historical materials, weigh competing scholarly interpretations of those materials, and offer independent conclusions informed by concrete evidence to prepare for the College Board’s AP United States History Exam in early May. The exam is optional.

United States Government and Economics 
Two Semesters  UC/CSU  
In this course, students spend one semester studying the institutions and principles of American governance and investigating the roles they play in the news and in our everyday lives. In the second semester, students study foundations of micro- and macroeconomics and investigate how these foundations affect people at home and around the world. At the same time, students will prepare and practice skills they will need to be successful after high school.

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics 
Two Semesters  UC/CSU 
Prerequisite: Recommendation of US History teacher
The AP United States Government and Politics course will challenge students to develop an analytical perspective on the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute government and politics in the United States. Topics for study include, but are not limited to, the constitutional underpinnings of United States government, institutions of national government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, mass media, public policy and civil rights. Coursework is geared towards preparing students for the College Board's AP United States Government and Politics Exam -- for which each student enrolled in this class must sit -- in May.